Climate change, agriculture, and COP22

| November 14, 2016

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The UN conference on climate change, known as COP22, brings together global actors to consider the response to climate change. The conference in Marrakesh, Morocco, started just days after the Paris Climate Accord came into force. The Paris Accord was adopted at last year’s conference, and calls on countries to work to keep global temperature rise this century to less than two degrees Celsius.

At this year’s conference, countries will discuss a plan to implement the Paris Accord. They will also discuss how to assist developing countries to take climate action.

Much of the focus is on the need for agriculture to adapt. As the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has said, “Business as usual is not an option.” Farmers are feeling the effects of climate change, and must adapt to continue to feed their families and communities.

To learn more about COP22, listen to this story from UN Radio (in French): http://www.unmultimedia.org/radio/french/2016/11/marrakech-cop22-maintenir-lelan-apres-lentree-en-vigueur-de-laccord-de-paris/#.WCLw6Wp97IV

Hear Rob Vos, director of agricultural development economics at FAO, discuss how farmers can adapt in this story from UN Radio (in English): http://www.unmultimedia.org/radio/english/2016/11/business-as-usual-not-an-option-for-farmers/#.WCA9KvkrKUm?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social+media&utm_campaign=faoknowledge

Or in French, hear from Alexandre Meybeck, conseiller principal à la FAO pour les questions liées à l’agriculture et à l’environnement: http://www.unmultimedia.org/radio/french/2016/11/climat-la-fao-appelle-a-se-preparer-a-une-transformation-radicale-de-lagriculture/#.WCLxfmp97IV

For more information on how agriculture contributes to climate change, and how farmers can take action to mitigate and adapt to climate change, check out these infographics from FAO: http://www.fao.org/resources/infographics/en/

You can also find news stories and resources online, by searching the #COP22 hashtag on Twitter.

Photo credit: FAO/Marco Longari